How to Boost the Creativity Inside Every Child | Children's Education

Don’t we all wish to have creative, independent, innovative and self-confident children? Being a mum and an educator led me to believe that as parents we should observe our children and allow their creative processes to evolve naturally. If we are successful in protecting them from the stereotypes of how they “should be”, we will have a much better chance of allowing their own personality to emerge and develop.

Creativity is inspired from an inner feeling – it’s almost an urge. Once we provide our children with the time and space to allow them to follow these creative urges without interfering, we are showing them that their creativity is valued.

From a very young age, children are naturally curious. They are fascinated with textures and objects; constructing a tower by joining blocks, building a home from empty cardboard boxes. These are the beginnings of a child’s creative development. Later, their imagination develops and they combine more complicated processes such as creating models, baking or cooking.

When children reach the pre-school age and early infant school, the educational focus is often turned towards maths, language and literacy. Most schools and nurseries recognise that arts and creativity has a great effect on all areas of child development.

The benefits of creativity

By allowing children to independently engage in arts and crafts, we are teaching them to make their own choices, take risks; be innovative, independent and confident. These are some of the main developmental milestones and targets we use to measure and observe their development in the Early Years setting. Engaging in art projects instils in children a “can-do” approach. On an emotional level, it also develops problem-solving skills.

Children’s motor skills are also improved in arts activities. Fine motor skills, such as an effective hand-grip, have to be altered in precision for different activities such as mark-making, cutting with scissors or gluing.

When children enjoy art in a group, language skills develop. Children learn new vocabulary, along with vital social skills such as turn-taking, negotiating, collaborating, elaborating on their work and at times following simple instructions.

Keren’s Top Tips For Unleashing The Creative Child

  1. Allow children to express themselves freely.
  2. Put together an “art area” in your home. Stock it with crayons, markers, finger paint, scissors, pastels, watercolours, brushes, glues, paper of various sizes and textures, found and foraged objects, DIY leftovers, and boxes and containers of all sizes.
  3. Save old costumes for dressing-up. Add to the collection with clothing you no longer need: hats, scarves, purses and shoes, or inexpensive at charity shop finds.
  4. Encourage children to create their own stories and act them out for you.
  5. Encourage as much outdoor play as possible
  6. When you read to your children, be dramatic. Act out stories with props and costumes.

Keren’s Nursery is an Ofsted Outstanding chain of nurseries with branches in Holland Park, Hampstead Garden Suburb and Belsize Park.

Come and see the nursery in action at Keren’s Holland Park Open Day on Wednesday 23rd January, 9.30 am – 11.30 am. Booking essential, email hollandpark@kerensnursery.com to reserve your place. 

Now accepting registrations for 2019, for children aged 10 months to rising 5 years.

Sponsored content in collaboration with Keren’s Nursery
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My Baba

"My Baba is packed with expert advice and information on all aspects of fertility, pregnancy, motherhood and parenting. We're constantly researching and reviewing the latest educational toys, gadgets and gizmos, and blogging about the latest crafts, activities, fashions and mouth-watering family recipes. My Baba is also the ultimate present guide with unique gift ideas for babies, toddlers and children of all ages." Leonora Bamford, Founder

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