Skiing With Children: The Right Age To Ski & Learning The Basics

Alpine Olympic skier turned instructor Pierre Koszali gives us the low-down on teaching children to ski, safety and kit, and getting the family on the slopes in no time!

From what age can my child ski?

Children from three years old can start learning ski. Manufacturers have developed specific boots and skis for them to enjoy learning how to ski. 

How quickly will my child pick up the basics?

From the age of five, children have enough strength to pick up basics in a couple of days. A week of holiday with lessons in a snow garden should be sufficient. By the basics I mean: walking around, gliding on very shallow slopes, using the snow plough technic to stop and turn.

Learning these skills gives them more and more confidence and fun.

What do I need to purchase in terms of kit and equipment, and what can be hired?

You should purchase good and warm gloves (probably most important), ski suit, goggles (with good sun protection) and thermo underwear if you don’t have. Frozen kids never enjoy skiing! 

Everything else can be hired, including boots, skis and poles, helmets. Please use real skis, not plastic ones you may find in a toy shop.

Should my child wear a helmet? What are your thoughts?

Yes, I strongly recommend helmets for children. Safety first.

A child’s head is proportionally much heavier than an adult’s one, so they tend to fall on it more often. Not to mention more fragile as well in case of collision.

Today’s children helmets are light and warm. They are comfortable and look good. Kids enjoy having a good helmet, they feel like champions!

I recommend adults wear helmets too by the way. I wear one all the time, as well as a back protection, not because I ski fast but because of possible collision. You wear a helmet while cycling, on or off road, then why not while skiing where speed usually exceed cycling? Ice can be as hard as concrete to fall on.

READ MORE: The Best Family Holiday Destinations For 2018

Where’s best to take my child skiing abroad and are dry slopes at home a good idea for them to practise on?

If you go with children on ski holidays and want them to learn skiing, choose a resort with good specific slopes for kids and dedicated snow gardens. They might not be in the biggest and most famous resorts but they will definitely help your children learn to ski quickly.

Indoor skiing is fine for practise, especially during basics and preferably on real snow. Dry slopes do not feel the same as real snow under your skis. You end up more sliding sideways than really shaping a nice turn on snow.

Are ski schools the best way to go, or is it easy to teach a child the basics?

I recommend going to a ski school in private or group lessons. Your children will enjoy and learn more. They will pick the right technique from the beginning, which will help them to progress quickly.

Teaching is not easy for parents, especially if you are not a good skier yourself. It’s unlikely you’ll be able to advise how to choose the best slope, what to teach and in what order.

How many hours should my child spend on the slopes per day?

This is difficult to answer. The time spent on slopes is depending on weather, tiredness, ski level, snow conditions, and fitness.

I would say one or two hours in the morning is enough for beginners. Then, do something else, like sledging for example, and your child may want to go back on skis in the afternoon.

Do not forget that you use a lot of energy in the beginning and cold temperature also makes children tired quicker.

What safety precautions should parents be aware of when accompanying a young child on the slopes?

There are many safety precautions to consider and be aware of on the slopes. For me, warm clothes and sun protection need to be suitable to the day before stepping outside. Secondly ensure the slope you choose is right for your skill level.

What should I pack in terms of first aid and any other supplies for my child, just in case?

Good sun protection and a couple of basic plasters for small cuts on fingers or so but nothing much more. Snow personnel are educated and equipped for common injuries.

What’s the one question you’re most frequently asked by parents of children that are new to skiing?

‘Do I recommend teaching with a ski harness on the child?’

I prefer a child to master his speed and direction alone. If he can’t, basics are not learned yet or the slope is too difficult. I personally didn’t use a harness for my three children but I won’t say harnesses aren’t beneficial. 

READ MORE: Skiing in Courchevel 1850 with Children

About The Author

Lauren Hyland
Assistant Editor

Lauren keeps our readers up-to-date with the latest London events: from family outings to workshops for children to date nights in the city, she knows exactly what’s on and where. Contact lauren@mybaba.com

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